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Markets.com

Offers five ways to trade: Forex, Shares, Indices, Commodities, ETF and CFD

 
Markets.com
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$100Min. Deposit Learn More
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Trust Score:

B

0

Established in:

2008

Regulated by:

CySEC, Financial Services Boar...

CFDs are leveraged products and can result in the loss of your capital. Rankings are influenced by affiliate commissions. All information collected on 1/11/2017.

The Ultimate Guide to

Choosing a Broker
For Trading Indices

Not sure which broker is right for you?

Don’t worry - we’ve got you covered. In this guide, you’ll learn:

Ready?

Part 1

Why Choose Markets.com
For Trading Indices?

Markets.com scored best in our review of the top brokers for trading indices, which takes into account 120+ factors across eight categories. Here are some areas where Markets.com scored highly in:

  • 9+ years in business
  • Offers + instruments
  • A range of platform inc. MT4, Web Trader, Tablet & Mobile apps
  • 24/7 customer service
  • Tight spreads from 2.0 pips
  • Used by + traders
  • Allows hedging
  • 5 languages
  • Leverage up to 100:1

Markets.com offers five ways to trade: Forex, Shares, Indices, Commodities, ETF and CFD. If you wanted to trade FTSE100 through copy trading or other means, skip to part two.

The two most important categories in our rating system are the cost of trading and the broker’s trust score. To calculate a broker’s trust score, we take into account a range of factors, including their regulation history, years in business, liquidity provider etc.

Markets.com have a B trust score, which is good. This is largely down to them being regulated by CySEC, Financial Services Board, segregating client funds, being established for over 9 years, and much more. For comparison:

Trust Score comparsion

Markets.com
Trust Score B
Year Established 2008
Regulated by CySEC, Financial Services Board
Uses tier 1 banks
Company Type Public Private Private
Segregates client funds

The second thing we look for is the competitiveness of the spreads, and what fees they charge. We've compared these in detail in part three of this guide.

Part 2

Who Markets.com is (& Isn’t)
Suitable For

As mentioned, Markets.com allows you to trade in five ways: Forex, Shares, Indices, Commodities, ETF and CFD.

Suitable for:

  • CFD Trading
  • Forex Trading

Not Suitable for:

To trade with Markets.com, you'll need a minimum deposit of $100. Markets.com offers a range of different account types for different traders including a mini account, vip account.

Finally, Markets.com isn't available in the following countries: AF, DZ, AS, AO, AU, BE, BA, BR, KH, CA, CN, CU, KR, GU, GY, HK, ID, IR, IQ, IL, JP, LA, MO, MY, MM, NZ, MP, PA, PG, PH, PR, RU, SG, KR, SD, SY, TW, TH, TR, UG, VI, VU, USA, VN, YE.

Part 3

A Comparison of Markets.com vs. vs.


Want to see how Markets.com stacks up against and ? We've compared their spreads, features, and key information below.



Spread & fee comparsion

The spreads below are illustrative. For more accurate pricing information, click on the names of the brokers at the top of the table to open their websites in a new tab.
Markets.com
Fixed Spreads
Variable Spreads
EUR/USD Spread 2.0
GBP/USD Spread 2.0
DAX Spread 2
FTSE 100 Spread 2
S&P500 Spread 1

Comparison of account & trading features

Markets.com
Spread type
EUR/USD Spread 2008
EUR/GBP Spread CySEC, Financial Services Board
Crude Oil Spread
Gold Spread Public Private Private
DAX Spread

Part 4

What is a Stock Market Index?

A stock market index is a measurement of an established segment of the stock market. It is often used as a type of benchmark from which the performance of other stocks is measured and is used by investors as a gauge for building a portfolio. For example the FTSE 100 is made up of the biggest 100 companies on the London Stock Exchange and provides a meter for the UK markets whilst the DAX index is made up of 30 of the top companies listed on the Frankfurt Exchange and is a meter of the German stock market.

The value of an index at any point in time is determined by the combined prices or combined capitalisation of stocks within that particular index. The index may be either a price weighted average or a market weighted average of all the stocks included in the index.

Each index essentially serves as a tracker of the overall performance of a particular portion of the market.

The Most Traded Stock Market Indices

Although there are many stock market indices, there are a few that are more regularly traded across the financial markets. Some of these indices are:

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average – Commonly referred to as “the Dow”, this index includes stocks of the top 30 companies in the United States in terms of size and influence. The Dow is price weighted which means that it derives its value from the weighted average of the prices of these 30 stocks. The value of the Dow represents approximately 25% of the value of the US stock market.
  • The S&P 500 Index – This index is the Standard and Poor’s 500 index and it is a portfolio of the 500 most traded stocks in the US stock market. Since the value of this index represents as much as 80% of the US stock market, it gives a good indication of the performance of the entire stock market. The S&P 500 is market-weighted rather than price weighted. The value, therefore, depends on the market capitalisation of the relevant stocks included.
  • The Wilshire 5000 index includes stocks of almost every publicly-traded company headquartered in the USA. Because of this, it is also referred to as the “total market” index.
  • The Nasdaq Composite Index – This index is more specialised than the others because it is comprised solely of technology stocks. It is market-weighted and includes all the stocks that are traded on the Nasdaq stock exchange. Not all stocks in the Nasdaq, are of companies that are headquartered in the US.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Trading Indices Through CFD Trading

Stock market indices are often traded through CFD trading. Trading indices via CFDs will allow the trader to trade on margin and to benefit from leverage. This means that the trader may purchase a certain number of contracts with a smaller account size, compared to what would be required to purchase each individual stock included in the index.

CFD brokers often offer margin to trade indices such as London Capital Group who offer margins as low as 0.20%. In addition to trading with leverage, a trader can both buy and sell contracts, giving the opportunity to benefit regardless of how the market is moving. Below are some of the trading conditions for Index futures with London Capital Group. For more details visit the LCG website.

Market Min Spread Min trade size Value of 1 point/lot Guaranteed Stop charge Margin required
UK100 4 0.1 lot £10 2 0.20%
Wall Street 5 0.1 lot $10 4 0.20%
Germany 30 3 0.1 lot €10 4 0.20%
US 500 0.8 0.1 lot $50 0.8 0.20%
US Tech 100 2 0.1lot $100 0.8 0.20%
France 40 4 0.1 lot €10 4 0.40%
Japan 225 15 0.1 lot $5 10 0.40%

*All information collected from https://www.lcg.com/uk/, see website for full terms and conditions. Example is for illustrative purposes only. Your capital is at risk. Last updated on February 1, 2017.

Another advantage of trading indices with a CFD broker like London Capital Group is that they usually do not charge a commission on the trades. The broker instead makes their profit from the spread.

One of the advantages of trading indices through CFD trading is also a disadvantage. Traders who decide to take advantage of the margin offered by brokers will have increased the upside when the trade goes in favour of the trader, however, the risks will also be magnified if a trade goes against them. Traders should therefore not trade more than they can afford to lose since they could lose 100% or more of their original investment.

Conclusion
Stock market indices are a statistical representation of a portion of the stock market. They may be price weighted or market-weighted and often act as benchmarks of the performance of the market. A stock market index may be traded through CFD trading which may magnify returns, but which may also magnify the risks.


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